Tag Archives: Faculty

Meet Professor Andrea Flores!

Andrea_FloresAndrea Flores will be an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education at Brown University starting this Fall 2016. Her research focuses on how Latino youth who participate in a college readiness program in Nashville, Tennessee conceptualize the value of higher education and civic engagement for themselves, their families, and their communities. In particular, Andrea focuses on how educational aspiration is tied to Latino youth’s senses of self and feelings of socio-civic inclusion in the United States. Andrea is also interested in the role of school-community partnerships in both facilitating persistence in school and reshaping public education. Her next project follows a group of students she previously worked with as they transition into private religious colleges.

Prior to graduate school, Andrea worked as a research assistant at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she worked on projects on youth’s online ethics and young people’s conceptions of trust. Her work at Project Zero inspired her to pursue graduate work related to adolescents and education. She received her bachelor’s degree in anthropology at Harvard University and her doctoral degree in anthropology at Brown University. An NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a grant from the Ruth Landes Memorial Research Fund, and fellowships from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation have supported her research. This fall, she will teach Education 1450, The Psychology of Teaching and Learning. As the sister of two elementary school teachers, she is very excited to be teaching in the MAT program. She is looking forward to getting to know the MAT students this fall and follow their progress during the year!

Science Students Attend ING Summit

Director of Science Education and Professor Dan Bisaccio, two current Master of Arts in Teaching students (Erin Capra and Kay Holland, Science MAT ’16), and an Undergraduate Teacher Education Program student (Emile Blouin, Science UTEP ’16) attended the Inspiring a New Generation (ING): A North American Summit on November 6-8, 2015. Dan Bisaccio was one of the organizers of the summit.

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Over 200 key stakeholders, many under the age of 35, gathered at the National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia, to design strategies to build life-long relationships with nature for current and future generations. Participants represented primarily the United States, Canada, and Mexico with several from other countries including China, Australia, Brazil, and Peru. The World Parks Congress, held in 2014 in Sydney, Australia, set the stage for the Summit by focusing a major strand on “Inspiring a New Generation”. The 2015 ING Summit built on the issues identified by the Congress and determined specific strategies to address them in North America.

The unique conference agenda was structured with brief provocations followed by facilitated whole-group discussion regarding what’s working well now; identifying gaps, successes and aspirations; brainstorming initiatives that would help the ING movement gain momentum; overcoming significant barriers to success; and identifying and paving the way for new initiatives. The resulting North American Framework for Action includes 15 initiatives that participants prioritized and committed to carry out in the next five years.

The Brandwein Institute hosted the conference in partnership with the National Environmental Education Foundation. Sponsoring organizations were the Canadian Wildlife Federation, the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, the American Nature Study Society, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and supporting organizations included Canadian Parks Council, Children & Nature Network, Parks Canada, IUCN Commission on Education and Communication, IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas, U.S. National Park Service and The Corps Network.

The 15 initiatives will be posted on http://ingsummit.org. The results and progress of the North American Framework for Action will be reported at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawaii in September 2016 and will serve as a model for other countries.

The Brown Education Department Speaker Series Presents Dr. Luther Spoehr

The Brown Education Department Speaker Series kicked off this week, and was proud to feature Dr. Luther Spoehr, a Senior Lecturer in Education and History at Brown University, and the Director of Brown Undergraduate Studies. Spoehr’s main activities at Brown involve teaching about the history of American higher education and the history of American school reform. His First-Year Seminar, “Campus on Fire,” looks at American colleges and universities in the 1960s. Other courses include a survey of the history of American higher education, the history of intercollegiate athletics, and the history of academic freedom. Dr. Spoehr also does work on best practices in the teaching of history and frequently consults with schools and school systems that want to improve their history teaching.

This Wednesday, Dr. Spoehr delivered a presentation to the Department of Education entitled “Francis and Ira’s (Sometimes) Excellent Adventures: Wayland, Magaziner, and Curriculum Reform at Brown,” a talk outlining the research Spoehr has conducted into Brown’s curriculum journey since the University’s founding in 1764.

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Dr. Spoehr began by discussing the University’s roots as a small school of approximately 80 male students, being taught Latin and the classics by a single professor, and then touched upon the (at the time) outlandish reforms implemented by President Francis Wayland in the 1800’s, allowing for modern languages and practical skills such as agriculture, and science and chemistry applied to the arts. These reforms were considered a failure initially, supposedly attracting a lower caliber of students, but today are frequently sited as being “ahead of their time”.

Brown University’s “New Curriculum” of no required core curriculum or distribution requirements was not born until the 1960’s, when student activists led by undergraduate Ira Magaziner (whom Dr. Spoehr has had the privilege of interviewing for his research) pushed for more engaging and utilitarian courses. Elements of Magaziner’s New Curriculum exist to this day at Brown University, and current faculty in the audience remarked that it is because of the lack of requirements at Brown that they can be sure that when they walk into a classroom, their students want to be there.

Professor Eileen Landay and Kurt Wootton, MAT ’97, authors of A Reason To Read

Ever wonder how Literacy and the Arts can coexist in the classroom? Be sure to check out A Reason to Read by Eileen Landay, a Senior Lecturer in the Education Department and also a former Director of the English Education MAT program, and Kurt Wootton, MAT ’97. Their book has been reviewed by the Harvard Graduate School of Education.